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, we may never satisfy the law's opponents, i think that's fair to say. some of them are rooting for this law to fail. it's not my opinion, by the way. they say it pretty explicitly. some have already convinced themselves the law has failed regardless of the evident. but i would advice them to check with the people who are here today and the people they represent all across the country whose lives have been changed for the better by the affordable care act. look, i have always said i will work with anybody to implement and improve this law effectively. you got good ideas, bring them to me. let's go. but we're not repealing it as long as i'm president. i want everybody to be clear about that. we will make it work. for all americans. >> and the president asked for help. >> i'm going to need some help in spreading the word. i need you to spread the were about the laws, about the benefits, about its protections, about how folks can sign up. tell your friends, tell your family. do not let the initial problems with the website discourage you because it's working better now, and it's ju
to sign into law a five cent gasoline tax increase 31 years ago when a nickel a gallon was real money. a user fee is in fact a different category from a general tax increase. the various groups that score such votes treat user fees differently. as we are attempting to resolve budget differences, there's an opportunity to embrace more transportation resources through user fee mechanisms that will have broad national support and not inspire the same fierce philosophical debate that's plagued and paralyzed our deliberations for years. it has the added benefit of being the fastest way to put hundreds of thousands of people to work at family wage jobs to help boost our flagging economy. i strongly urge my colleagues to take a step back and look at this as a way to crack the code, to meet vast unmet needs of our constituents and stabilize a critical part of our budget. who knows? if we can find a way to thread this particular transportation funding needle, how many additional opportunities are there to solve problems going forward if we can address them? this is what it -- i think what it t
of the year. we find ourselves starting to think about time. time, which is running out on a law that keeps plastic guns from being able to make it through metal detectors at airports and schools. and if congress does renew the law in time this week, it may come with a pretty big loophole. is anything going to happen this week? we'll also be taking a look this morning at everyone's fascination with the new pope. pope francis. with what may be an evolution on his part away from hot button social issues and toward economic ones. he's got liberals loving him. he's got conservatives attacking him. he's like no pope we have seen before. speaking of the catholic church, since it is a sunday, we thought we would introduce or maybe reintroduce our guests to the sacrament of confession, unburdening ourselves of our unpopular political opinions. stick around for that. when is an important question in politics, so is where. as in where do you live, where do you come from? we'll talk liz cheney, scott brown, and the art of carpetbagging. we have five easy steps to make sure you don't mess it up. but, f
-relations healthcare.gov. republicans will continue to law,tigate the health care holding for hearings today on its rollout. the white house is coming under pressure to hold someone under accountable for the failures. republicans, (202) 585-3881. democrats, (202) 585-3880. all others, (202) 585-3882. let me begin with the new york times story this morning, considering which heads may roll for the website. the white house is under mounting pressure from democrats and close allies to hold a accountable person botched rollout of president obama's signature domestic achievement and determine who should be fired. some of those names are familiar to you have have been watching the hearings on capitol hill as some of them have testified about what went wrong with the rollout and to knew what and when there would be problems. we will go outside of washington. we have for the calls inside the beltway. think? you according to the new york times, the president is under mounting pressure from democrats. numbers. the phone you can also post your comments on facebook.com/c-span and tweet us. times,ng to the new
know may have, eh, played a little bit with the tax laws in this country to get a little bit better return. or maybe not have to pay so much. are they takers? you'll say it's legal. well, it's legal to get food stamps. how about those oil companies that take your tax subsidies? would they be takers? oh, no. how about those folks in detroit that are getting all these tax breaks because they're, quote, bringing business while employees who spent 30 years working for the city are getting shafted with their pension. there's no takers in that deal at all, is there? what about walmart? they have never had a tax abatement on any land going into any city, putting up one of those superstars, have they? no, there's no takers there at all. they only made $19 billion. i can't think of another corporation out there that might need another tax break. but you know what we're talking about over on the right, we're convincing americans that it's those damn food stamps. they're the problem. they're the takers, those fat, poor people. how come they can't find work? it's their fault. they're lazy. and
in britain. and it may have different laws and may threaten to sue my publisher in a back out. then, an international, the raiders organization invited me to come to think that i talked to members of the house of lords because they were rewriting defamation laws. and they had to go. so i am hopeful that we will deal to publish in the wind. you know, it was a consideration when i first talked to the editor of "the new yorker," well before paul haggis to that of the church can we talked about my interest in writing about scientology and we were mindful of the fact that coming in now, the church had, for instance, when "time" magazine did an exposÉ, scientology suit "time" magazine. they lost every step along the way, all the way to the supreme court. but it was the most expensive suit "time" magazine never defended. it took 10 years. i didn't want to put my magazine to that, nor did i want to spend 10 years making acquisitions. if you think there's a chilling effect, there is the chilling effect. but i think now, more people are writing about scientology. i want to commend you and yo
: in the minutes after the derailment, according to a senior law enforcement source, rockefeller told first responders, going along and i'm in a days, i don't know what happened. ntsb investigators say that ten-year veteran driver was on the second day of a five-day shift. >> the day was a typical nine-hour day. these days were routine days. there's every indication he would have had time to get full restorative sleep. >> reporter: his lawyer says he went to bed at 8:30 and got up at 3:30 a.m. that his client had a good night's sleep and is cooperating in every day. >> i think it takes a strong man to come down and be honest. that's what billy's doing. >> reporter: on the question of the brakes, rockefeller had initially claimed, according to a source, that they didn't work. >> we determined that the metro north mechanical department performed a proper brake test prior to the accident train leaving the station. and there were no anomalies noted. >> reporter: the federal rail administration is expressing serious concerns about metro north's recent series of accidents. in a letter to the head
this wouldn't work. today is not a good day for the complainers league. it looks like the health care law is open for business. it looks like after all the misery love company types have had their say, a solid majority of the country wants the president's program to make it. the website, we're told, is working. as i said, what a bad day for those little trolls who live under the bridge. david corn is the washington bureau chief nor mother jones magazine and michael tomaski is with the daily beast. i want you to look at this poll and what people think about this. right now 55% of the country supports the idea of making it work. they want to keep it as it is, make it work. only 43% want to repeal it. another interesting number, a little more nuanced according to a current cnn orc poll. a majority of americans 53% said it was too soon to tell. saying it's not seen its day in court. not yet. keep in mind these polls were conducted before improvements to the law's website were announced over the weekend. so, david, there's good objective news and good perceptive news. totally 180 from the way
into replace and repeal after years of quotes and votes to undo the president's healing care law, they have to figure out what to do as the base meets a new reality. hillary clinton's shadow campaign marches on, why is bill clinton talking about one of his most famous campaign quotes from 1992. it's not it's the economy, stupid. in ukraine it looks like a cold war up rising stuck in a debate over democracy. we will go live to kiev for the latest. good morning from washington. this is "the daily rundown." coming up, a deep dive into bit coin and how it could fit into the world's phi national future. this is a wild new currency gaining steam online. let's get to the first reads of the morning. you can call the last month and a half for the republican party. after losing the last two contests after the shut down in the midst of a battle in the party, republicans clearly have the political swlj it comes to health care. they are in a bit of a quandary. they believe healing care is a winning issue, they are not sure of the next move. the president will test out some of the themes of the upcoming
is this law is working and will work into the future. people want the financial stability of health insurance and we're going to keep on working to fix whatever problems come up. >> and so it begins. and this will last until december 23rd, the deadline for people to enroll if they want plans beginning on january 1st. each day the white house says they will plug different benefits that you can get through obama care with help from democrats and progressive action groups. even though we've heard more insurance pitches from the president in the last few months than buill murray endured in "groundhog day." >> just visit healthcare.gov. >> funny you should mention your health because -- >> deal is good. the prices are low. >> i sell insurance. >> what a shock. >> they're leaving a million people now without health insurance. >> i got the feeling you ain't got any. >> people want affordable health care. >> oh, ned ryerson. even if the president succeeds in his career as an insurance salesman over the next three weeks, there are a lot of big questions about the implementation of his law. joining me
. he has said, and this is coming from a senior official close to the investigation, a senior law enforcement official with knowledge of the investigation that the driver said i was in a daze. i don't know what happened. and this was -- he was referring thering to coming along that straight section of track and hitting the curb at 72 miles an hour. he had gone in the previous two minutes from 60 miles an hour to 72 miles an hour on the 30-mile-an-hour rated curve, applying the brakes literally five seconds before the train came to a rest. essentially almost as if it was coming off the rails at the same time. so that does seem to tally with what he's saying. obviously, fatigue of all the crew involved is something that the ntsb will be looking at. they will be looking at the 72 hours previous to see what he was doing, where he had been,ing what -- whether or not there might be something that would have caused him to be, in his words, in a daze, wolf. >> you say he was going 72 miles an hour. yesterday the ntsb said the train was going 82 miles an hour as it hit that 30-mile-an-hour
? >> and obama care. back from the dead? >> i need to you spread word about the law, about its protections about, how folks can sign up. >> can the affordable care act be saved? let's go "outfront." hello, everyone. i'm in for erin burnett. "outfront," cnn is learning the engineer involve in the deadly train derail many in new york was, quote, nodding off and caught himself too late, unquote, to prevent the deadly crash. that's according to union representative anlth bottalico. according to investigators, he passed the breathalizer test but said he was in a daze and doesn't know what happened after the crash. the national transportation safety board said there was no problem with the brakes. four people were killed and at least 67 others were injured. some of them severely when the commuter train entered a sharp turn going 82 miles an hour in a 30-mile-per-hour zone. nic robson is at the crash site with the latest. >> reporter: human error, william billy rockefeller's daze, increasingly the probable cause. his union representative saying he was nodding off and caught himself too late. >> he is e
. one compelling possible clue has emerged. two senior new york law enforcement sources telling cnn the engineer told investigators at the crash scene that he was, quote, in a daze. that's a quote. in a daze just before the disaster. cnn's nic robertson is joining us from yonkers, new york, outside new york city, at the ntsb briefing. what else did we learn? >> reporter: well, we learned the ntsb has now looked at the signaling. they say that they found no anomalies in the signaling. if we remember, the engineer was quoted as saying right after the accident that he applied the brakes, knock happened. the ntsb say they've had an examination of the brakes, and they feel that the results have come back showing that there were no problems with those brakes. this is what they said. >> we've determined that the metro north mechanical department performed a proper brake test prior to the accident train leaving the station, and there were no anomalies noted. based on these data, there's no indication that the brake systems were not functioning properly. >> reporter: well, the other thing th
if it was going too fast. >>> president obama is said to make some comments about his health care law at a youth white house event today. it's the second-straight day he will be talking about obama care. as karen travers tells us, that's by design. >> reporter: president obama highlighted the progress at healthcare.gov. but once again, he reminded americans that the health care law is not just a website. and he had a strong message for republicans. he said the health care law is here to stay. >> my main message today is we're not going back. after just the first month, despite all of the problems in the rollout, about 500,000 people across the country are poised to gain health care coverage threw marketplaces and medicaid beginning on january 1st. >> reporter: but the white house says the problems are almost fixed. over the next three weeks they'll make a big push to get people enrolled so they have health insurance by january 1st. john and diana? >> karen, thank you. >>> bill clinton is clarifying recent comments about health care. president clinton recently said that mr. obama should keep his
as the least productive in our american history. >> 55 bills have been signed into law. this is the least productive congress ever. >> the least productive congress in the history of the american penn. >> it's literally a do nothing congress. >> that's not fair. they are doing something. they are getting into the guinness book of world records and that's twice if you count john boehner's fingernails. >> good morning it's thursday, december 5th. the tree lit up last night. that was quite an event. wasn't it? >> kate and jack were watching last night. very exciting. >> good night. >> for a tree that they senselessly slaughtered. >> welcome to the show. we got contributor mike barnacle, also dragged involuntarily from his family. katty kay. and senior political editor for the white house and white house correspondent for "huffington post," sam stein. and katy, quite a bit of news today. >> apart from the tree. >> apart from the tree and apart from willie. a press conference in tallahassee today that may shake up college football. >> yeah. the superstar freshman quarterback for florida state
. it shocked many. their sentences were handed down in the same week as restricted protest laws. millions are being forced out of their country in droves. a lack of food has left them it'so late. >> we have this report. >> hundreds of refugees from fighting and distribution in their country. they walked several kilometres in the cold in rain. this 80-year-old arrived with her mentally challenged son. food supplies have been cut off. bakeries have been destroyed. there's no food or drink. if people see someone with a loaf of bread, they bid like at an auction. most are poor and dest it ute and is have to pay smugglers to ensure the safe effort. the revies arrival was with nothing more than documents. for most they experienced the longest journey to safety. three months ago. these people were turned away at the boarder. know they do. >> >> translation: i am sure the camp is better than living under air strikes. we lost a lot of family members. >> syrians used to cross into jordan. heavy fighting prevented thousands crossing through. this longer, safer route is crossing near the border into
of the health care law. what does that entail? >> this is what democrats wanted for two years. they say every day between now and december 23rd they will do some event to talk about each day one different good part of the health care law in their view. the idea is they got to do something about this sinking poll numbers for health care reform. they got to recalibrate the debate gaven they went through the worst possible coverage of the roll out. the question is, can that work. if the site does work. if people does start to get health care coverage you'll get a different debate. the question is how much damage was done and is this thing fixed? you guys had a good conversation yesterday on the show yes the front end fixed but is the back end fixed in a way to lead people getting coverage that they can trust that insurance companies know what benefits they are getting as far as subsidy from the government to provide. >> if you go on this big campaign to highlight the website and highlight the plan and program it better work, right? so the front end of the website will work but there's problems w
. >> as a loyalist to the president, as somebody who is behind this law and worked hard with the team to get it passed, do you want to see somebody held accountable for this disastrous rollout? >> my view is that i can't make the decision whether or not it's best to fire somebody because ultimately this lies on the president's shoulders. we can't fire the president. >> you're saying if anybody should be held accountable, it should be barack obama? >> absolutely. >> the buck stops there. and we hrerd when he was running for president -- and we heard when he was running for president, beware, this is somebody who never had any executive experience. he's never run anything. now here we have rolled this out and it has been terrible. and he only met kathleen sebelius, it wasn't even one on one but face-to-face one time. this was his signature achievement. i think next time, a word to kathleen sebelius -- i know you're watching -- if you want to see the president more often, learn how to golf. at the same time i think he golfed 100 times. >> but is that okay with you? this is the signature plan of
in south africa in then 48. they set about passing a series of impressive laws of racial segregation. they western considered citizens. in 1960 when drarts went to the police station in the black town of sharpville and redanded to be arrested, they were protesting the node to have them in the first place. in response to that small act of rebellion, south african police officers opened fire on the crowd and scene people were killed that day. the young liberation leader named nelson mandela said it was that moment that radicalized him in the fight against apartheid, to beat the anc, it wouldn't be long before he was arrested and convicted of treason and sent away to prison for life. he recalls america and bren and across the west for governments to speak up, to use their power, their influence in a country where the west had huge investments in mining interests. to use that influence to free him and fight apartheid. >> that didn't happen. years passed. decades passed. an international movement sprung to boycott business, to di vest from them. to impose, to try to get governments to imp
, but the train would not slow down. this is according to law enforcement who is at the scene. what could have caused that? >> well, it's two pieces. when did he hit the brakes, was he too far into the turn before he hit the brakes, so the recorders are going to tell us when and how much of an application he applied the brakes to. i assume he tried the emergency stop. so the recorders are going to tell us when that happened and just what that means to the accident, but there's a lot more to it than just the speed that this person was going or this train was going. if the condition of the rails, don't lose sight of the fact there was a previous derailment just months before this one at this location, so was the rails repaired properly, was there a problem with the underlying structure of the rails. all of those will be investigated thoroughly. >> the fact that there was an accident close to this location, does that set off warning bells to you? >> oh, yes. yes. the ntsb will focus in on that, definitely, for track condition and geometry. >> in the curve, this went from 70 miles per hour to 30 m
, too. >> a lot to look out for. >>> president obama vowing to keep fighting for the health care law, urging americans to focus on the benefits of obama care, despite the barrage of criticism over the rollout of healthcare.gov, that website that had so many problems. >> the bottom line is, this law is working, and will work into the future. people want the financial stability of health insurance. and we're going to keep on working to fix whatever problems come up in any startup, any launch of a project this big that has an impact on one-sixth of our economy. whatever comes up, we're going to just fix it. >> meanwhile, former president bill clinton says his recent suggestion that president obama keep his word and let people keep their health insurance plans was not aimed, or not trying to distance hills from the president's health care law in an effort to help his wife hillary's potential 2016 presidential bid. >> i said nothing about this. not one word, until the president himself spoke. i don't think you can find anybody in america who's worked harder for his re-election or supporte
nelson by a teacher later on. after studying law, his trouble making politics ticks began, and as a boxer he became adept at picking fights and sparring with the an hart hide authority which had increased its oppression against the black population. it was there that mandela made the crucial decision to take up an arms struggle launch the armed wing. he was militant and a fire brandie fointly burning his passbook, a dred the document the an hart hide authorities used to control the movement of south africa's black population. >> the africans require one the franchise on the basis of one man, one vote. they want political independence. >> that simple.demand and the methods he took to fight for democracy eventually saw him and others tried for treason and sabotage by the apartheid government, acts punishable by death but they got life imprisonment instead, banished to robben island one of the country's most brutal and isolated prison. another political prisoner remembers the first time he saw mandela in the primp yard. >> i could see from the way he walked and from his conduct that here was
law enforcement sources tell the engineer, there he is, said he was quote, in a daze. this was revealed to investigators moments after the derailment that killed four and injured more than 60 others. investigators now say this train carrying 150 passengers approached the sharp curve, here's the map, approached the curve doing 82 miles an hour. this is a bend with a speed limit of 30 miles per hour. 82. that is too fast even for the straight away with a 70-mile-per-hour limit. nick is on the scene of the crash and joins me here in the new york studio. wow. now we are hearing about dazed. what do we know from the operator. what led to this? >> well, what he describes as going along in a daze, those were his exact words -- >> not asleep, in a daze. >> in a daze. he says i don't know what happened. this is what he told investigators after the accident. what we do know is five seconds before the train actually physically came to a rest, that's wlthat e that's when the brakes were applied. that's pretty much when the train is actually coming off the rail itself. building th
that president obama back when he was a law school student had stayed with him in cambridge, i thought it was the right thing to do to go ask him. nobody had asked him in the past, and the president said he in fact had met omar obama when he moved to cambridge for law school, and he stayed with him for a brief period of time until his apartment was ready. >> so that's what jay carney says. the only real difference here was that he, jay carney, physically asked the president face-to-face, whether he met with the uncle, and that was the difference. the president said, yes, i met with him and stayed with him for three weeks. i spoke with the attorney for the uncle. the uncle's name is an youngo obama. but the uncle threw a congratulatory party for barack obama when he graduated from harvard law school. that's where they're trying to iron out some of the contradictions. >> the uncle came as a student to the united states. was about to be deported, but what, for 50 years, there was this case going on, and only in the last few days has he been told he can stay in the united states legally. >
the law. they wouldn't allow him to get out of jail and go home to his son. the sacrifices he made not to have any ranker and deliberate that nation with no rank and revenge, he was truly one of the world's remarkable people in history. >> he went back to south africa after leaving. he was that committed. he could have been selfish and gone somewhere else in the world. how will you remember this man? what was he like to meet and to be around? >> to be in his presence, the time that i was there, you knew you were in the presence of greatness. hoe had a gravity. hoe had a humility that you did not find in any other person. i have been around a lot of presidents and heads of state. there was something that was a balance of humility and gravity and greatness that you sense. you don't care what you thought you were going to say going into a meeting. it evaporated in his presence. it wasn't his overwhelming and the guy who tried to overwhelm or rule. it was his mere presence that changed the elements of a rule. >> what are effect did he have on you, reverend sharp? >> very much so. if i
of the media. there's no law that's going to stop people from going into town and violating this request. that's where it gets difficult. from cnn's perspective, there are many, many ways to cover this story without being there. while acknowledging the requests from the town. you can have retrospectives, look at the individuals of the victims, you can revisit some of the unknown elements of the crime itself. so i think that cnn is doing the right thing. other news organizations are as well. and this is going to come up again and again, unfortunately, because the fascination, horror of the story, will not diminish. >> hearing from those parents, i'm conflicted. i really actually admire the strength they showed today to come out, because they know that there is this need, this demand. america wants to mourn with them. so here we have them giving this full statement and saying essentially, listen, we're talking now. but come saturday, we want complete and utter privacy. is that how you see it? >> it is. and you know, they're not saying we don't ever think the media should be here and we're never
was traveling with two of his children, his daughter-in-law and future son-in-law. it's unclear when aerial searches will resume. >>> an oakland woman who lost her son to gun violence will take part in a rally next week in washington, d.c. 17-year-old christopher jones was killed in a drive-by shooting outside his family's home new year's i've 2010. no one has ever been charged in the case. his mother says she's part of a contingent that will represent california at a national vigil for homicide victims. it will be held at the washington national cathedral two days before the first anniversary of the newtown, connecticut, school shooting. >>> thousands of people are expected to gather for a memorial to honor actor paul walker tomorrow. walker was killed last weekend wrt porsche i was riding in crashed in santa clarita. a memorial at that crash site has been growing ever since. thousands of people have rsvped for the memorial at 5:00 sunday at the scene where walker died. . >>> while people are waking up to a little snow and in some parts of the bay area. if that's the case it usually means
successfully lobbied bill clinton to pardon his law client, marc rich. >> fugitive. >> fugitive marc rich. there was a big to-do then. jack was big time in the barrel. he's hauled before congress. he feels like he's being looked at in restaurants. and ed gillespie said, "look, jack, in a few months everyone's going to forget about this and all they're going to remember about you and this incident is that you got something big done." and sure enough -- you know, jack did a good job for his client. the outrage dissipated. and the firm -- the lobbying firm thrived with the rest of the industry. >> four years later, they sold out for $40 million. now how do they make that much money in four years and the talent they bring is that they're creatures of washington? >> that's a very, very, very valuable commodity. i mean, if you can sell yourself as someone who knows how washington works, someone who has these relationships, someone who can get on the phone and get the president of the united states to pardon, you know, your fugitive client, that's a very, very marketable commodity. i mean, if yo
to change the subject as much as possible. laws and the city are taking care of very important response abilities here until they've been pigmentation problems can get worked out. in one sense it helped. but also similar reason driving is as both parties are trying to kick this out for two more years to have an election and decide how these issues get resolved. accommodation suggests they will get a deal in the next couple of days. dagen: this is if you have described it to use your words some low hanging fruit. how does this deal come together and what are the chances it does? >> i think it is slightly better than 50% chance it is going to get done. remember, the two chairs negotiating the steel are not here to tell us what they want to get done, they feel confident they will get something done. the issue here is last-minute demands. the republicans think they need some level of entitlement changes to get the rank-and-file members, thre slayer pushing han this changes to hospital spending for medicaid. the democrats pushing for more spending on unemployment insurance possibly inclusion
. that partnership requires, amongst other things, that our labour law be reformed so that it is in line with international standards, apartheid vestiges are removed and a more harmonious labour relations dispensation is created, on the basis of tripartite cooperation between government, labour and capital. the government is determined forcefully to confront the scourge of unemployment, not by way of handouts but by the creation of work opportunities. the government will also deal sensitively with the issue of population movements into the country, to protect our workers, to guard against the exploitation of vulnerable workers and to ensure friendly relations with all countries and peoples. the government is also taking urgent measures to deal firmly with drug trafficking some of which is carried out by foreign nationals who are resident in the country. we must end racism in the workplace as part of our common offensive against racism in general. no more should words like kaffirs, hottentots, coolies, boy, girl and baas be part of our vocabulary. [laughter] [applause] i also trust that t
think it's conventional assumption that they should be able to do this, though. >> reporter: federal law does provide them immunity unless they act in bad faith and that's the question here. this involves a pilot for air wisconsin airways flying commuter planes for united express. he had to take new tests to be upgraded to a different plane and he failed a simulator test three times. he claims he was set up by people in the airline who wanted him out. but in any event when he failed it the last time, he got mad, he yelled at the instructor, threw his headset off, jammed his seat back. after that, the airline decided, you know, we'd better tell tsa about this. this pilot had been cleared, as many pilots are, to carry a firearm. the airline booked him a return flight as a passenger back to his home, but after a couple of hours, told the tsa that he was mentally unstable and might have a gun. and the plane, as it was taxiing away, had to come back to the gate. federal agents came on the plane, dragged him off, opened his suitcase off, said where's your gun? it turned out he was at home. he
the law and there was a lot of misconduct in relation to that, saying that they actually were alleging that inmates were beaten and humiliated, and then after all of that was done, that they went ahead and covered up their misconduct. nine sheriff officials face charges, three brothers are charged with criminal complaints. now, one thing that has come out here, too, is this conduct about the behavior of sheriffs at l.a. county jails. the sheriff has come under fire about this over the last few years, saying that there are certain sheriffs that were not just falling in line. we are expecting to hear from him later on today to see what his take is on all of this. we can confirm now that 12 people who have worked in the county jails, either previously or right now, have been arrested. >> stephanie, what do we know about this fbi informant? >> reporter: well, we asked the fbi if they were going to confirm that this informant was a part of this, and that he was basically hidden inside the jail from the fbi by the sheriffs. they are not confirming that that exactly has happened yet. we are s
at law school and we would go out to dinner and he and bobby would sit there and talks about the existential issues suffering so dramatically from the assassination of jack kennedy to talk about issues of do you believe in god. i remember vividly i remember to me that opened with my father not on the policy level but on a personal level. >> something to touch on he was also right tea film reviews. and it just does drop to have him give me a chapter and verse about the structure he was the forest, but not the bad way the spending the us numbers at the cape but had told in the wintertime but the letter that comes solid even when he pulls out the stiletto in a graceful way you always know where you stand a and we were talking earlier as happily as the man could he was in the stakeout is in manhattan. [laughter] the civility question is interesting in the earlier volumes that steve been edited he had lunch with kissinger and but to say quite different things of buckley. [laughter] but one thing. >> one of the it vintages of this book over a 50 year period. him in buckley used to
the preventive benefits you get after the health care law. open enrollment ends december 7th. so now's the time. visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-medicare i took my son fishing every year. we had a great spot, not easy to find, but worth it. but with copd making it hard to breathe, i thought those days might be over. so my doctor prescribed symbicort. it helps significantly improve my lung function starting within five minutes. symbicort doesn't replace a rescue inhaler for sudden symptoms. with symbicort, today i'm breathing better. and that means...fish on! symbicort is for copd including chronic bronchitis and emphysema. it should not be taken more than twice a day. symbicort may increase your risk of lung infections, osteoporosis, and some eye problems. tell your doctor if you have a heart condition or high blood pressure before taking it. with copd, i thought i'd miss our family tradition. now symbicort significantly improves my lung function, starting within 5 minutes. and that makes a difference in my breathing. today, we're ready for whatever swims our way. ask your doctor about symbico
'll bring you the very latest. >>> plus as americans scramble to catch up on the new health care law. new accusations dozens of russian diplomats may have been scamming our existing system for big bucks. more on what they're accused of doing. >>> a hiker survives in freezing temperatures after falling down one of the most popular volcanoes in the country. hear about her dramatic rescue, all "happening now." jon: well, a wicked ice storm takes aim at america's midsection. hello, i'm jon scott. >> hello, everybody, happy friday to do you, i'm jenna lee. freezing rain and sleet and snow. watches and warnings are already in effect for multiple states stretching from texas you will all the way into ohio as millions and millions people line the path of this early winter storm. jon: nothing but rain outside of our windows right now. texas, snow and freezing rain created huge mess on the road, also in the skies. hundreds of flights already canceled in dallas alone. in new mexico, people there are digging out as much as six inches of know fell in albuquerque, closing schools and bringing that city
helped solve many cases and they are upholding that law where many have been accused of serious felonies. >>> they have several parking meters and the transportation agency also wanted to buy an extra 10,000 meters to install in new locations but the city council voted against that idea. >>> they will offer incentives to pick up people in wheelchairs. cab drivers will pay and while chair accessible cabs will go to the front of the lean at fso to pick up passengers. >>> san jose may impose new rules that could drastically impose marijuana dispensaries in the city. it will keep dis dispensaries away from homes and park. >> medical marijuana supporters say they will fight back with a ballot measure. it has been one month since they met with success but are split and traffic volume has been reduced and the casino is bringing more money to the area but sonoma says sheriff's deputies are saying this is creating crime. this is the busiest beat but the impact on crime in the city is small. in walnut creek, they have more which would outline development over the next 20 years. they said it would
they have not been released? >> the law required they be released. we have in connecticut a very strong freedom of information act and the judge really had no choice but to order their release and the prosecutor had to yield to this process and he decided not to appeal that ruling. of course my heart went to the families because they are now reliving the unspeakable and i will never forget the sights and sounds of parents emerging knowing that their children would not be coming home that day, and i think the tapes bring back those memories. they force the entire community and all of us involved on that one day to relive the grief and the speed that all of this occurred. it is not only the scope and the horror and the courage of those educators who were on the speed of what happened. >> i went to president to newtown, and the grief was tangible. it was a physical thing you could feel. it is difficult to talk about even right now. in the last few weeks, there was an information, there was haunting details from the shooter who was clearly a young man suffering from sight mental health issu
to hide her crime from friends, family, and law enforcement. allegedly sending her e-mails from a fake account. >> prosecutors have to prove she intended to kill him. >> reporter: she's pleaded not guilty. her attorneys admit her story changed over time. but maintain that johnson's death was an accident. the defense writing in the brief that despite testimony that graham suffered from cold feet, witnesses thought the wedding was perfectly normal. >> this case will come down to whether the jury believes that she regretted this marriage so much that she pushed him off the edge. >> reporter: graham's attorney revealing the plan to show a starkly different image of her husband's lifestyle. charges of sec-degree murder, volunteer manslaughter and involuntary manslaughter are possible. abc news tried to reach out to attorneys on both sides but have not heard back. >> we'll follow the case all week long. >>> a lot of other news. for that, it's ron claiborne. >> hi, again, dan and bianna. she's making me laugh. in the news today, a national day of prayer and reflection, started a week of event
emotional, dramatic event. i just spoke to a federal law enforcement source who says of course there's a bit of nervousness but they think they are in good position here. you have support planes, groups that have already gone over, there will be plain clothes people in the crowd and all that. think of the fascinating moment for the former presidents in the sense you have jimmy carter who was president when the iran hostage drama played out. george w. bush called iran the axis of evil. president obama who is trying to negotiate what would be a historic breakthrough on the nuclear program, do they talk about that at all? when the former presidents talk, mostly we learn nothing because those are off the record communications. but boy, you would love to know if they exchange any notes or historical reflections or observations. but it's a big historic event and we will find out in bits and pieces after about the interaction between the presidents themselves. >> it would be interesting to see what if anything happens, because there will be representatives, high ranking officials from iran, for exa
was a brutal regime but it was made up of lots, hundreds of petty little laws that all together created this racial monster so black people couldn't come into the towns to stay, to live. you know, there was a real sense of two separate nations. nelson mandela along with many of the anc and other political parties all created the environment by which this was broken over the decades. it didn't take a short time to do. it was years and years and years of protests and of defiance. here's a life that is remarkable. started in 1918 at the end of the first world war. let's take a look at the life, the legacy of nelson mandela. nelson mandela's struggle for freedom defined his life. he was born in the remote hills of south africa's eastern cape. he was given a name which means troublemaker. he was only given the name nelson by a school teacher later on. after moving to johannesburg and studying law, mandela's troublemaking politics began. as a boxer, he became adept at picking fights and sparring with the apartheid authorities which had increased its oppression against the black population. it
mandela even though he had a law degree and was quite privileged with his family background, chose to live here side by side, shoulder to shoulder with other black south africans who were also struggling through the ills of apartheid. behind me, you are hearing some of the similar statements robyn is hearing, songs from the struggle, songs in honor of nelson mandela. in a way, what people are doing here is thanking madiba for helping elevate many poor black south africans into the middle class by ushering in democracy and becoming the country's first democratically elected president. on this street today, you will find restaurants and bars and middle class south africans spending their disposable income in a place where it wouldn't have been possible decades ago. and indeed, this will also be the location of the first official memorial service for nelson mandela on tuesday at the stadium which is also significant because it was the last location he made an appearance in public during the closing ceremonies for the world cup. so as is true in many other locations in the country, these celeb
, a discussion about the law and dealing with whistleblowers and its effectiveness. plus, your calls, e-mails and tweets on "washington journal" on c-span. social media is an old idea. we think it is recent and only people alive today have done it. there's a very long and rich tradition of social media that goes back to the late roman republic. that is first century bc in the point is you do not need a digital network to do social media. you could actually do it in your own face. cicero did it with messages running to and from and other members of the roman elite. they all spoke each other as a social environment. there've been many other examples throughout history. martin luther and his use of pamphlets. tom payne and his common sense. in the way that pamphlets were used during the revolution. >> the first 2000 years of social media on a quote the communicators" on c-span two. >> republican governors rick perry discuss the gop future. then a conversation with u.s. trade representative about of the current state of u.s. trade agreements. at 11:00 p.m., q and a with a doctor. >> a group
, he says, how is the family? i said, the family is fine. as a matter of fact, my wife and sister-in-law and two grandsons are in the car. he said in the car? he said bring them in. so he came, asked for them to come in and we were in the foyer of his office in his home and he met my grandsons, my sister-in-law and my spouse. it was a wonderful, wonderful time. >> i this i a beautiful corollary on that story that gives a sense of how nelson mandela knew who he was, knew what he represented. is it true he said to you, bring your family in, let them know that nelson mandela thinks that you are an important man? >> yes. he was very, very gracious. he looked at mayan grad sons, one 11, one 13, first time they visited south africa. he said do you know your grandfather is a very important man? and i just couldn't handle it. i said, nelson mandela is saying i'm an important man? he says, yes, he's the united states ambassador to south africa. >> of course when it came from him, not only did it mean a lot but it was also about what it was motivated by. it wasn't being pompous, of course, it was
for president kennedy, and he became very close to him. and i used to visit my father when i was at law school when he was living in new york and i was living in cambridge, and he would take us -- he would often take bobby and myself and others out to dinner. and he and bobby would be sitting there talking about existential issues, about the issue of -- because his brother still suffered so dramatically from the assassination of jack kennedy. he would talk about issues like whether he still believed in god. i remember being privy to these conversations, and my father was the kind of person almost like a counselor to kennedy, that he would be willing to be that open with my tower and seek -- my father and seek his advice not just on a policy level, but also on a personal level. >> one of the things we haven't touched on, jon, is that when he was a white house counsel to the president and kind of an in-house historian keeping track, he was also writing film reviews. john was not kidding when he talked about having correspondence with groucho marx. i loved to go to dinner with him if for no ore r
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